Clark Hall Doors

3034 Griffith St
Charlotte, NC 28203
704-987-0777

Three-Door Dilemma

Some homes have multiple entries along the front. We call this the three-door dilemma. The dilemma is whether to change just the entry door or all the doors and, if all the doors are changed, should the design be different or the same? Excluding the obvious consideration of budget here are a few things to consider when deciding whether to change adjacent doors.

Structural Integrity. One of the benefits of our doors is their maintenance-free aspect of the door and their ability to withstand direct sunlight and precipitation. If the doors are not protected from the elements, it may be wise to make the investment in all the doors now to avoid replacement in the future. The home pictured has two living French doors immediately adjacent to the front entry.

Aesthetically, just changing the front entry would have looked great; however, the existing doors were damaged from the elements and the right structural decision was to change all three doors. If you are replacing your doors, check the condition of all of them. If they need replacement, then our doors will be a good choice for the long term to avoid future replacements.

Aesthetics. Often we are asked if the design of the secondary front facing doors needs to be the same style. The front entry always stands on its own and should have elements that define it as the primary point of welcome for your guests. This can be achieved in many ways. The home below used a slightly different design and art glass for the main entry door. Seedy baroque glass was placed in the circular design to provide clear delineation from the secondary doors. Consider what you will see from both the exterior and interior of the home. The secondary doors on this home are off the dining room, accomodating the french divided light doors.

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